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Republicans need to get out and vote in the mid-terms of 2022 and take back the power from the Democrats.

Why you need to be mad as hell about the military pay cut

Posted 12/29/2021, by Michael Cavalier – Editor

   The US military is going to be taking a pay cut in 2022. But you probably already knew that if you’ve been following the news about it recently. What you may not have known, however, is that it’s not because military pay isn’t keeping up with inflation – the raise just isn’t high enough to keep up with the full value of what military personnel actually get paid after factoring in inflation.

I   t’s time for us to take a serious look at where we are today. One hundred years ago, World War I was in full swing and our small country needed a strong and capable fighting force. Over 16 million men were registered for that war, and almost 3 million served overseas. In 1918, more than 116,000 Americans died while serving their country. Since then…we have not been in such dire circumstances again—until now!

   We still face enemies who would do anything possible to bring down our nation, yet instead of raising up those brave soldiers willing to stand up against these threats, there is talk of cutting back on their resources? This does not make sense! A Troubling History of Pay Cuts for Military Members: In March 2018, Then President Trump signed a $1.3 trillion omnibus bill.

   Effectively raising caps on discretionary spending and granting an additional $80 billion for defense funding. But there was a catch: The budget deal included a provision requiring federal workers’ salaries to be reduced by 0.5 percent in the fiscal year 2019 and an additional 1 percent in the fiscal year 2020. As one newspaper explained, Most civilian federal employees have not received across-the-board pay increases in more than a decade.

   A Troubling History of Pay Cuts for Military Members: In March 2018, President Trump signed a $1.3 trillion omnibus bill, effectively raising caps on discretionary spending and granting an additional $80 billion for defense funding. But there was a catch: The budget deal included a provision requiring federal workers’ salaries to be reduced by 0.5 percent in the fiscal year 2019 and an additional 1 percent in the fiscal year 2020.

   As one newspaper explained, Most civilian federal employees have not received across-the-board pay increases in more than a decade. So while members of Congress will receive their next automatic salary increase—as they always do—on Jan. 8, it’s unlikely that civilian employees will receive theirs anytime soon. According to a report from the National Active & Retired Federal Employees Association (NARFE), This plan shifts too much cost to federal employees… It raises questions about whether these cuts should be applied only prospectively or retroactively [to already planned pay raises]. Either way, employee morale is hurt. Why should our servicemen and women not get a cost of living raise?

   Some Americans don’t believe the military needs to make more than just a good living. They put their lives on the line every day, even now as I write this article we are being protected. This is what some Americans believe when asked: Do you think the military needs a raise that outdoes the inflation?

   The simple truth is that there’s no real reason why U.S. soldiers should receive a pay raise if any at all. As it currently stands in 2018, service members are already receiving compensation greater than many civilian jobs with a comparable educational requirement, and that doesn’t even take into account certain other perks like health insurance and retirement plans — both of which most civilian jobs don’t have an equivalent for at all. On top of all that, active-duty troops get up to 100% tuition assistance when seeking higher education after they leave active duty.

   So what gives? Why does Congress want to nickel-and-dime our uniformed heroes on top of everything else they’ve provided them with? It comes down to two things: congressional politics and bureaucracy. A number of representatives who themselves served in the military choose to overcompensate on behalf of our troops out of patriotism or nostalgia. This has led some politicians to argue that the American taxpayer pays twice (once while enlisting and again while paying taxes) for a soldier’s salary, thus necessitating higher wages during their time of service.

   More than ever the military needs the American people to take it to Congress. It’s simply outrageous how the Senators and House representative get their raises on time, and we are not talking pennies or nickles. If Republicans don’t come out and vote, then the military should deny you protection?? NO, they wouldn’t do that, just ask any Veteran out on the street. Something should be done for them as well.

God Bless America, God Bless the Veterans

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